Rescuing Easter

I need to rescue Easter.  Not for our world.  Not for our nation.  Not for our church.  Not for you.

I need to rescue Easter for me.

Over the past several years, I have become increasing aware that Easter has lost its significance to me.  Honestly, it has proven to be a rather boring holiday.  Church hasn’t been particularly helpful in that process.  We would attend, of course.  Then we would return home for a nice dinner.  Then…nothing.  In reality, for me it was—apart from a bit more candy available and some hyper children—it was just another Sunday.

It’s not always been like this.

I trust that part of my issue is related to the spiritual funk I have been in for years.  While I don’t necessarily see a genuine light at the end of the tunnel, I do believe I can be proactive in my personal rescuing of Easter.

Several plans have been implemented.  First, once I noticed the classic movie The Ten Commandments was playing in the theaters this week, I made plans to go.  My daughter and I went last night.  I grew up watching that movie around Easter.  I enjoyed our discussion about themes presented in the film as we drove home.  Second, I am planning to attend the Good Friday service at our church tomorrow night.  Third, I plan to take at least one of the kids to the Easter sunrise service at a local park.  A friend is sharing the devotional.  I attended these annual services when I was a student in college many years ago.  Fourth, I signed us up for the pancake breakfast at church.  We have not participated in the past because of my anti-social bent, but I reasoned that Christ should be celebrated in community.  Deep down, we all know that is what ought to happen.  Fifth, we’ll be attending church as a family.  In spite of my funk, that is something we do almost every week, attending some 45-48 Sundays a year.  Sixth, we’re hosting Easter dinner at our house for Jodi’s family.  A traditional ham dinner with all the trimmings is planned.  I look forward to feasting together as a family.

These are the proactive steps I am taking to remind me that Easter isn’t just another Sunday; to ensure that this eternally-significant event does not pass me by yet another year.

But I am especially wanting to put concerted effort into the seventh activity on my list.  What is seventh?  I do not know. Everything described above might fall under the category of external activities.  These are things that I do.  What I am lacking, I think, is that which might best be called the existential element.  I guess I am looking not merely to celebrate Easter, but to experience Easter all over again.

Does that make sense?

I want the objective to penetrate the subjective.  I want the historical facts surrounding the resurrection of Christ to transition from my head to my heart.  That’s what used to happen every year when I was a young believer.  Maturity has worn off the edges of my excitement.  The joy I found in Jesus which was once only a couple layers deep is now buried under many scars.  The intimacy with the triune God of Scripture is now barely visible at a distance.

Am I beyond hope?

You know that I am not.  The fact that I want to know Christ more intimately is a sure tell sign of spiritual life.  My desire to fellowship with God is an indication that, even if I am not advancing at a rapid pace, I am facing the correct direction.

I guess the seventh item on my list is prayer.  Seventh, I’ll ask my friends to pray with me.  What I would like to happen—to rescue Easter for me isn’t possible by me.  Try as you might, it’s something you can’t accomplish either.  It’s a task only the Lord Himself can handle.  If you might, please pray for me.  And perhaps some of what I have admitted above resonates with you as well.  I’d be happy to pray for you if you sense that need.

Thanks!  Enjoy your celebration of the risen Christ!

PS–My post Lost in Luminary from August 6, 2014 is written on a similar theme.

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